Red Kangaroo die off

Hundreds of red kangaroos have been found dead in far western NSW Qld and SA. Despite good feed and plenty of water around, something, as yet undetected, is killing kangaroos and making the survivors very weak. The epidemic started late in September and is continuing in pockets.

Retired Veterinary Officer Greg Curran in Broken Hill said “It was predictable. Similar outbreaks occurred in the 1998 and in 2010 after floods and good seasons.” He was receiving reports from people seeing

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Chinese forestry experts learn of Australian wildlife management

George Wilson provided lectures to a delegation of 18 forestry managers visiting Australia from the State Forestry Administration of PR China. Lectures covered an overview of wildlife protection legislative and operational activities, roles of Commonwealth and State law, kangaroo management including commercial use, threatened species management, Indigenous wildlife land management – needs and opportunities including carbon farming, tourism and bush tucker.

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Can private ownership of wildlife remedy shortfalls in government funding for conservation?

We ask the question in a paper in Conservation Letters and propose trials to test it.

Landholders, community groups, and investors would have a form of wildlife ownership by leasing threatened species on land outside protected areas.

They would be able to acquire animals from locally overabundant populations, breed them, innovate and assist further colonization/range expansion while making a profit from the increase. They may choose to reinvest any profits in further conservation.

The role of government would be to regulate, as is

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IUCN World Conservation Congress

George Wilson was iucnone of over ten thousand participants including many Australians who attended the WCC in Hawaii in September. The overall theme was ‘Planet at the Crossroads’ building on the Paris Agreement on climate change, the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the ‘Promise of Sydney’, Aichi Biodiversity Targets, the Earth Charter, and The Honolulu Challenge on Invasive Alien Species. During the 10 days of both the discussion

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Fairfax media article – kangaroo welfare depends on landholders being able to benefit

Kangaroos have long competed with pastoral production systems on the rangelands. They move onto spelled paddocks and it is therefore essential to manage them to control total grazing pressure. By cooperating across property boundaries, landholders should be able to undertake more sustainable land management, convert a liability into an asset by earning income from kangaroo products, and carbon and biodiversity credits. Doing so would follow overseas precedents of devolved responsibility and proprietorship of wildlife. It would improve welfare outcomes. See

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European Wildlife Bank

Greg AndrewsGeorge Wilson met with Threatened Species Commissioner Greg Andrews on 16th of December. They discussed Georges project and draft paper on greater private sector involvement in the conservation of threatened species. Greg was interested in overseas practice in South Africa and Europe which enables private investment, proprietorship and regulated trade to operate as market-based incentives to conserve wildlife. See European

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Australasian Wildlife Management Society Perth 23rd – 26 Nov

Impact of feral cats on threatened species was major conference theme. What is cat’s role in the decline of the Woylie, which is now back on critically endangered lists? Is the rise of cats an example of meso-predator release following too successful fox  (and dingo) control?

Other discussions were management of the insurance populations of Tasmanian devil’s both on mainland Australia in zoos and Tasmanian

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The Great Elephant Census – Congo and Uganda

AWS is supporting the Great Elephant Census by conducting technical reviews of aerial surveys that have been conducted in Uganda and the Congo.  Dozens of researchers are flying in light aircraft to capture comprehensive observational data of elephants and elephant carcasses. The project supported by the Paul Allen Foundation is designed to provide accurate and up-to-date data about the number and distribution of African elephants using standardized aerial surveys of tens of hundreds of thousands of square kilometres. A standardized

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