Category: Aerial surveys

Aerial surveys on Angas Downs 2012

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By , November 15, 2012 10:03 am

Annual aerial survey monitoring was conducted  on Angas Downs IPA in July 2012. These surveys complement surveys also conducted in 2010 & 2011. IPA Rangers and Jennifer Smits (AWS) counted animals seen at low level and 200 m on either side of the aircraft. Species targeted /observed included camels, kangaroos, horses and cattle.

These studies are vital to understanding populations of kangaroos and pressures from camel and horse populations on the property and hence native wildlife. Some results are published below. No significant increase or decrease in any of the surveyed species was recorded between 2010-2012.

Since Angas Downs is such a vast area to survey, the variance and error of the datasets collected make it difficult to assess any significant change in the estimated population density. Good thing is Malu (red kangaroo) populations appear to be stable, and feral populations of horses and camels are appear to be decreasing (or not significantly increasing), undoubtedly due to the management actions of the IPA rangers. Densities of red kangaroos across Angas were estimated at 1.02 per sq km in 2010, and 1.13 per sq km in 2012. It was found that the southern area of the property was much more productive and watered, and supported more head of kangaroos than the northern sand dunes. Hence the aerial surveys were split in the north and south for 2012.

A report is being finalised and will be available soon. For more information on past Aerial surveys click here.


 




ABC Interview on Red Kangaroos on Angas Downs

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By , June 26, 2012 3:02 pm

Local NT ABC Radio reporter Caddie Brain interviews Dr George Wilson, Australian Wildlife Services about kangaroos on Angas Downs IPA… Click here  for the transcript and to listen to the story.

” The team from Angas Downs Station are working hard to increase red kangaroo numbers on the former pastoral property. Rangers are reinstalling water points, undertaking aerial surveying and developing the facilities to become a release site for recovering roos who have fallen on some back luck (fenced roo enclosure).

Dr Wilson says the roo enclosure will became an educational tool and tourist attraction.

“It’s amazing, there’s very few places in Australia where tourists can reliably see red kangaroos in the wild yet it’s our national emblem. But the display is only part of a broader land management strategy to increase numbers on the property.”

“Eventually, with the support of the local Indigenous community, we’ll develop a sustainable hunting regime. This property is here to blend their continuing traditional needs with science.”

AWS aircraft

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By , July 19, 2011 3:12 pm

AWS has acquired a part share of an aircraft to assist with our field work and data collection. The Cessna 182 Turbo was flown out from Florida in USA via Hawai and Samoa, landing at the Gold Coast in late April.

In June it was used in a survey of feral camels in the Great Victoria Desert in central Australia.

In late August 2011 it provided support to searches of gullies and remote creeks on Angas Downs looking for Anangu art and heritage sites. It also conducted kangaroo and camel survey of the property.

Camel survey from the air – Great Victoria Desert

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By , June 10, 2011 10:06 am

AWS is collaborating in the collection of information on the distribution and abundance of camels in the Great Victoria Desert. The project involves large-scale aerial survey across the South Australian and West Australian border. Transects are flown at 250 feet above the ground and a 200 m strip is observed on either side of the aircraft in which camels are counted. The results are then used to estimate camel populations in the region as a prelude to subsequent control.

In recent years the growing size and impact of the feral camel population in Australia’s rangelands has emerged as a serious issue of management. The Australian Government has committed $19 million to a four-year project to reduce the number and density of feral camels around priority environmental assets (biological refugia and high conservation value aquatic ecosystems). With an equivalent level of activity by state governments, there is potential for a significant reduction in the size and impact of the feral camel herd, as well as opportunities for some development of a local camel industry. More details at http://www.feralcamels.com.au