Australian Wildlife Services GIS, Spatial Information & Mapping Capabilities

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By , February 3, 2012 2:05 pm

AWS has full GIS capability in house using ArcGIS (ArcMap, ArcInfo), Mapinfo, Manifold. We interface these programs with Google Earth for easy customer viewing and use. Our mapping and GIS work ranges from digitizing hand drawn maps, complex spatial model development and producing spatial wildlife density estimates. AWS also works with Cadastral and Topographic digital databases, Landsat and SPOT imagery and can provide vegetation and fire mapping services. And our GIS analyst is reasonably priced.

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GIS Services Available

  • Spatial data capture, analysis and management
  • Cadastral and topographic database and map production
  • Digital elevation models
  • Map delineation and digitization
  • Georeferencing
  • Analysis of remotely sensed data for classification, mapping and evaluation/monitoring of environmental factors
    (vegetation, landuse, fire etc)
  • Spatial modelling to support decision-making
  • Landsat TM and ETM analysis.

Examples of spatial analysis projects:

  • Wildlife population and biodiversity density assessment analysis and mapping
  • Digitizing hand drawn weed and weed survey maps for report publication
  • Vegetation classification, analysis and thematic mapping
  • Cultural and management data capture
  • Soil and geology mapping, water resource mapping
  • Proposed flight lines for aerial surveys.

For map examples and more information download AWS’s GIS Capabilities  AWS GIS Capability (1019 downloads)

Introducing (more) large herbivores to Australia?

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By , February 2, 2012 9:00 am

In a Comment in Nature: ‘Introduce large mammals and increase hunting pressure’, David Bowman is proposing a more holistic approach to managing Australia’s troubled ecosystem. He advocates introducing large mammals such as elephants, rhinoceros and even Komodo dragons to help consume flammable grasses and control feral-animal populations. At the same time, he recommends employing Aboriginal hunters who could help to control feral-animal populations and restore the traditional practice of patch burning.

AWS  believes this proposal is fundementally flawed. For one, it over looks that the Australian climate and hence the productivity of the environment is intrinsically one of boom and bust on a massive scale. How would he feed and water these large animals during the recurring busts? They would starve and trash the landscape as they starved. The impact of camels cattle and buffalo during droughts is already very damaging.

We are all in favour of more science to actively managing landscapes, and support for Aboriginal traditional practice and Aboriginal land managers to increase preferred species. How about more kangaroos to eat the grasses?  They don’t produce methane, are adapted to the consequences of climate variability by controlling their breeding, and they are already here.

New Scientist refers to AWS views.