Survey and fieldwork at Angas Downs

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By , May 28, 2010 4:32 pm
AWS has conducted five field trips to Angas Downs in the last year. Activities involved: training Indigenous Anangu Rangers to track and survey native animals, birds and sand tracks, landscape health assessment techniques such as Landscape Function Analysis, installation and monitoring of photo points and water quality monitoring. Aerial surveys for kangaroo and camel populations were conducted in June 2010 and pitfall trapping for smaller animals and reptiles is planned to occur later in 2010. Australian Wildlife Services understands the advantage of combining science and traditional knowledge to monitor and protect the landscape and wildlife. Listening to what Indigenous people want from their landscape is vital to this. A report summarising field work completed in 2009 has been compiled. Download the 2009 Angas Downs monitoring report Angas Downs Monitoring 2009 (853 downloads) See also Angas Downs Cybertracker, Reptile Surveys, LFA and Soil Carbon.

Tourism opportunities for Indigenous Communities in central Australia, Angas Downs

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By , May 28, 2010 4:26 pm
AWS has been providing advice and support in development of small scale, tourism ventures on Angas Downs Indigenous Protected Area (IPA) by members of the Imanpa community who own the property. Angas Downs is on the main road to Uluri National Park and Watarrka National Park and has many thousands of visitors cross it each week. AWS has produced a set of posters to be displayed in the Mt Ebenezer Roadhouse on the Lasseter Hwy. They detail the IPA and management, the rich natural resources, ranger works, tourism enterprises, and pastoral and aboriginal histories. This resource provides information to tourists and local Anangu people from Imanpa about Angas Downs Indigenous Protected Area. Led by members of the Imanpa community, AWS has helped coordinate a few trial tour runs through the property including Rotary groups interested in culture, education and philanthropic activities overseas University Students interested in environmental and wildlife studies. AWS particpated in a workshop called ‘Stepping Stones’ at the Imanpa community in May 2010 to help develop tourism on Angas Downs along the lines of tag along 4WD cultural/historical tours and student groups, using a similar structure to Anangu Tours at Uluru. More details of Angas Downs IPA in Angas Downs IPA Plan of Management (948 downloads)

Biodiversity Offsetting Recommendations: Endangered Yellow Box Blakely’s Red Gum Woodland

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By , May 28, 2010 4:23 pm
Australian Wildlife Services have recently been involved in providing sound revegetation and rehabilitation recommendations to offset disturbance of endangered Yellow Box Blakely’s Red Gum Woodland in the Googong Foreshores area (ACT/NSW). Rehabilitation and revegetation was to occur in an adjacent poor condition, cleared woodland area to the disturbance. There were three main limiting factors to successful development of good condition box woodland identified by AWS: overgrazing by eastern grey kangaroos, widespread occurrence of weed species including many noxious species, and the likelihood that soil seed stocks of native species were degraded. In order to allow the successful offset and development of good condition Grassy Yellow Box Red Gum Woodland, a scope of works was provided. Management actions recommended included construction of a kangaroo deterrent fence, a targeted and robust weed control program and direct seeding of target tree, shrub and ground cover species. Works are to be commenced later in 2010.

Indigenous wildlife management – scientific research support

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By , May 20, 2010 11:34 am
In an opinion piece in the Journal Wildlife Research published in May 2010 AWS outlines how science could play a greater role in ensuring that Indigenous wildlife harvesting is sustainable. The paper discusses the role of Indigenous wildlife use in helping to address community health and employment challenges facing Indigenous Australians in remote and rural areas. An abstract is available on the CSIRO website at http://www.publish.csiro.au/nid/144/paper/WR09130.htm   The full paper is available from our downloads - Indigenous wildlife management in Australia to enable sustainable use (507 downloads) We are anticipate that the paper will lead to positive outcomes for Indigenous wildlife managers and a re-distribution of investments to what we hear Indigenous people saying is a high priority.