Methane emissions from animals

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By , January 14, 2010 12:13 pm
An article in The Australian recently revisted AWS  interest in the potential of kangaroos as producers of low emission meat compart to other species. It contained a table with an incorrect legend that had been inserted by a sub-editor.  The correct table and legend follows:

Emissions from animals

Animal No. Animals 1999 Enteric methane (CH4 Gg/yr) Enteric methane (CO2e Gg/yr) Enteric methane/head (CO2e tonnes/animal/yr)
1999 Data from Australia’s National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Only domesticated animals counted, average of State values
Dairy cattle 3141200 339.74 7134.54 2.27
Beef - pasture 23291900 1739.90 36537.90 1.57
Beef - feedlot 558100 41.69 875.49 1.57
Buffalo 8600 0.47 9.87 1.15
Sheep 116800400 773.08 16234.68 0.14
Goats 201700 1.01 21.21 0.11
Cattle and Llamas 1500 0.07 1.47 0.98
Horses 220300 3.96 83.16 0.38
Donkeys/mules 200 0.00 0.00 0.00
Pigs 2626600 2.88 60.48 0.02
Poultry 88694800 0.00 0.00 0.00
Deer 3200 0.03 0.63 0.20
Ostriches/emus 147900 1.58 33.18 0.22
Other 126700 0.63 13.23 0.10
2005 Data from National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Only domesticated animals were counted, average of State values
Dairy cattle 3058554 347.73 7302.26 2.39
Beef 23224139 1847.23 38791.80 1.67
Beef - feedlot 1318089 101.61 2133.86 1.62
Sheep 101124878 681.45 14310.48 0.14
Goats 461491 2.31 48.46 0.11
Horses 221043 3.98 83.55 0.38
Deer 59469 0.64 13.36 0.22
Buffalo 6207 0.34 7.17 1.16
Donkeys/Mules 289 0.00 0.06 0.21
Emus/Ostriches 73788 0.37 7.75 0.11
Alpacas 2066 0.02 0.43 0.21
Camels 1846 0.08 1.78 0.97
Poultry 78187040 0.00 0.00 0.00
Pigs 2537859 3.69 77.43 0.03
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Kangaroos 34000000[1] 0.003[2]

[1] The average number of kangaroos from 2001 to 2006) in the selected commercial kangaroo harvest area (Department of the Environment 2007). [2] Kempton, T.J., Murray R.M., Leng R.A. (1976) Methane production and digestibility measurements in the grey kangaroos and sheep. Aust J Biol Sci 29, 209–214.

Kangaroo farming and the carbon economy

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By , January 11, 2010 5:05 pm
AWS is working with a Kangaroo Management Cooperative of pastoralists and kangaroo harvesters in central Queensland.  We are examining if lower dependence on cattle as meat producers can reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) in the atmosphere. Lowering total grazing pressure will also reduce water consumption and can drought proof properties. Ruminant livestock produce the GHG methane and so contribute to global warming and biodiversity reduction. Methane from the foregut of cattle and sheep constitutes 11% of Australia’s total GHG. Kangaroos, on the other hand, are non-ruminant forestomach fermenters that produce negligible amounts of methane. AWS is considering offsets generated from emissions sources in Australia not counted toward Australia’s Kyoto Protocol target, where they meet eligibility criteria and use a methodology that has been approved under the National Carbon Offset Standard. The Standard is intended to ensure that consumers have confidence in the voluntary carbon offset market and the integrity of the carbon offset and carbon neutral products they purchase. Income from carbon offsetting such emissions has the potential to improve financial viability of pastoral enterprises and ensure greater resilience in face of recurring droughts. It could establish alternative income streams. Plant growth of both trees, shrubs and native C4 grasses once lower stocking rates are established will sequester carbon in forest, rangeland vegetation and soil. Reducing grazing pressure will lead to reduced soil degradation, an increase in water quality and an increase in habitats and wildlife corridors. Biodiversity will increase, both in species abundance and the number of individuals in populations, particularly in highly important riparian environments. AWS has prepared a Project Information Note as part of our analysis and development of the offset project for presentation to the carbon market.  Our objective is a robust and transparent audit model that provides confidence. Independent audit validates the eligibility and robustness of offset project methodologies, and the amount of emissions reductions offset projects achieve. More details on kangaroos, cattle and opportunities are also in the AWS paper on our publications page.